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Workshop Welcomes 2019’s Teenage Prodigies

Meet two students training in this week’s intensive 2019 Vail Jazz Workshop

The flight to Colorado to attend the Vail Jazz Workshop marked Natalie Barbieri’s first time on an airplane. However, like all of the young musicians selected for the workshop, the 17-year-old from Long Island, NY, has notched several experiences outside the range of “typical” for most teenagers. For instance, she regularly performs until 4 a.m. at a West Village bar on Monday nights (dragging her parents along, since she’s not 18) in a jam session run by Billy Joel’s former saxophonist. She’s attended Manhattan School of Music’s pre-college program for the last four years, spent the summer with Berklee College’s Women in Jazz Collective and has big plans for her future. Right now it’s the Vail Jazz Workshop, an intensive, week-long learning session featuring 12 of the nation’s top teenage musicians (selected from about 150 applicants). The week of ear-learning and focused improvisation culminates with students performing on stage for the 25th Annual Vail Jazz Party alongside their workshop mentors, Vail Jazz Party House Band pros John Clayton, Dick Oates, Terell Stafford, Lewis Nash, Wycliffe Gordon and Bill Cunliffe.

“I didn’t have much of a chance to travel when I was younger,” Barbieri says. “There’s a lot I want to accomplish. I want to be a performer, I want to release my own music. I want to see the world.”

One of Barbieri’s earliest musical memories was at a family event in which a big band was performing and she climbed on stage to join them.

Natalie Barbieri. ABOVE: Anton Kot – photo by Todd Rosenberg.

“My parents were busy having a conversation and when they turned around, I was dancing on stage with the big band. I don’t know what it was … there was something I was drawn to,” the teenager recalls.

Growing up with a music teacher mother, it wasn’t much longer before Barbieri, at barely 3 years old, sat down at the piano.

“I came and sat down at my mom’s piano and I started figuring it out … one note and then two,” she says. “Then my mom called my father and said, ‘we have a problem … because she’s playing ‘Brick House.’”

Learning by ear from this tender age, it wasn’t until Barbieri was about 13 that she took up the alto saxophone after also learning the clarinet and focusing on classical music. It was the sax that allowed her to truly connect the music with her emotions.

“With jazz and saxophone, I could put my own feeling into it,” she says. “I think it was the spontaneity of it, the fact that people could put their emotions in it and create something on the spot.”

Now when Barbieri plays, whether it’s on stage performing or practicing at home – glancing at the clock to see that it’s 1 p.m. and glancing back what feels like moments later to see that it’s somehow 6 p.m. – she gets lost in the feeling of it.

“It’s hard for me to explain for people who haven’t seen me play. When I’m performing, I go someplace else,” she says. “My mother tries to record me, but I hate watching myself on the playback. You can see that I’m somewhere else. It’s very spiritual sounding … but I close my eyes and leave my body.”

Growing up in Brooklyn, Anton Kot also began developing his innate passion and talent for music at an incredibly young age … specifically, in his high chair as a baby. He was drawn, quite literally, to a different beat.

“I repeated two notes when hungry as an infant and extended those notes as a way of helping myself go to sleep,” he says, adding that he has photos of himself playing chopsticks in a family favorite Asian restaurant as a 1-year-old. “I played anything in sight…bread loaves, tin cans and cellar doors. I could mimic sounds so closely that they confused people in the subway. I was able to re-present the sounds of the L Train moving, yet it was standing still. I have always been very drawn to sound.”

As a child, this tractor beam pulled Kot into musical experiences all around New York City. Latin artist Louie Miranda noticed a 4-year-old Kot drumming along in the audience at a botanical garden performance and called him up to the stage. Kot continued to perform with Miranda’s band for thousands of people around the city throughout his childhood. He’d also attend Brazilian percussion performances in local parks, build instruments with artist Ken Butler at his SOHO studio, stop for Peruvian panpipe and plastic bucket drum performances in the subways. Eventually, Kot and his family moved to Connecticut, where the young musician joined the Neighborhood Music School in New Haven, studying with Jesse Hameen II, Rina Kinber and Istvan B’Racz. In sixth grade, he joined Thelonious Monk III on stage at Woolsey Hall.

Today, at age 17, he attends Manhattan School of Music and not a second of his waking life –and not many when asleep – go by when he’s not working out a beat.

“I will awake and play the piano before going to school. If I am late, it may be because I needed to record some new ideas that happened in my sleep,” he says. “Sometimes I awake in the middle of the night and will record something new.”

He uses the hour and a half-long drive to Manhattan School of Music to do homework. He does the same on the way home, unless he’s practicing something he learned that day. Some evenings, he plays gigs around the city. Others, he travels to Wesleyan University to participate in the Advanced Gamelan Ensemble. On Sundays, he returns to NYC to practice in an ensemble at Jazz at Lincoln Center. On Mondays, he plays a gig at Dizzy’s Club. He comes to Vail on the heels of a jazz tour in Asia with famed trumpeter Sean Jones and Grammy winner Kurt Elling and sharing the stage at Carnegie Hall with Vail Jazz favorite Wycliffe Gordon.

Studying under Gordon and the other ace instructors at the Vail Jazz Workshop, Kot hopes to learn something new and ultimately, to impart something himself down the line to young musicians and audiences everywhere.

“I would like for my music to be useful to others in positive ways,” he says. “I like the idea of offering something that can reduce the stress of people’s daily responsibilities, to take people out of this pattern of habit and let go and enjoy themselves. I have a true sense of myself when playing. When performing, I can feel that no one can disturb me. I am in a place that is inside-out. At the same time, I always depend on the environment, the space, the people in the audience, the bass player, the pianist, the horn section and so-on. I love when everyone is making a connection, and the moment when you can feel that connection taking place.”

In addition to Anton Kot on drums and Natalie Barbieri on alto sax, the 2019 Vail Jazz Workshop features teenage musical prodigies Ethan Avery and Max Nierlich on trumpet, Joey Ranieri and Gavin Gray on bass, Seth Finch and Vittorio Stropoli on piano, Jett Lim and Benny Conn on trombone, Miguel Russell on drums and Nico Colucci on tenor saxophone.

Vail Jazz All-Stars Aug. 29 at Vail Square

Catch the Vail Jazz Workshop students after their transformation into the Vail Jazz All-Stars, kicking off the 25th Annual Vail Jazz Party and a triple header performance beginning at 6 p.m. Aug. 29 at the all-weather Jazz Tent at Vail Square in Lionshead. Their performance will be followed by workshop graduates turned professionals, the Vail Jazz Alumni Quintet and then the masters themselves, the Vail Jazz Party House Band: John Clayton on bass, Dick Oates on alto sax, Bill Cunliffe on piano, Lewis Nash on drums, Terell Stafford on trumpet and Wycliffe Gordon on trombone. Tickets are $55.

Not-To-Miss Vail Jazz Party Shows For All Music Fans

As usual, the Vail summer is flying by at mach speed, but the season’s crowning event – the Vail Jazz Party over Labor Day weekend – is geared up to be summer’s grand finale like never before.

Celebrating its 25th anniversary, the 2019 Vail Jazz Party is pulling out all of the stops and you don’t have to be a staunch jazz fan to catch a dose of the thrill ride. There are only a handful of such parties across the globe, in which a collection of the world’s most acclaimed jazz artists descend on the same place for several days of multimedia performances and one-of-a-kind jam sessions that will never again be recreated.

Because the blowout event is comprised of more than 45 hours of performances over five days, picking and choosing which shows to hit can be challenging. If you are new to the party or not necessarily a jazz connoisseur, there are plenty of performances that appeal to a broad audience and will be sure to blow your hair back no matter what kind of music you love. Here are five to consider:

  • A tribute to Ray Brown –1 p.m. Friday, Aug. 30

Growing up in Pittsburgh in the 1930s, Ray Brown was barely a teenager when his fast-fingered, unique ability to play the upright bass put him on the national radar. He moved to New York City, joined the famous Dizzy Gillespie band, became a Grammy Award-winning composer and Downbeat Jazz Hall of Famer and is recognized as one of the most skilled bass players of all time. Brown’s talent and style can be appreciated by anyone who revels in a deep, bouncing bass line. Starring in this performance is a trio of famed musicians who actually performed and/or recorded with Brown before his death in 2002 – Vail Jazz Party House Band leader, fellow bass player and Grammy winner John Clayton, drummer Jeff Hamilton and pianist Larry Fuller.

  • Jazz & The Struggle for Freedom – 8:10 p.m. Friday, Aug. 30

Led by Byron Stripling, one of the world’s most recognizable trumpet players (he’s starred in Broadway musicals and produced theme songs for numerous TV shows and movies), this performance highlights the connection of jazz music to the Civil Rights Movement. During a time when racial inequality ruled the day, a handful of black Americans were gaining national and even global popularity as jazz musicians, becoming major influencers of pop culture, pop music and turning the tide for all black Americans.

  • The Jazzy Side of The Beatles – 9:35 p.m. Friday, Aug. 30

Nobody would promptly classify The Beatles as jazz music, but the crossover is stronger than you’d think. As it turns out, the styles of the best-selling band in history found its way under countless musical umbrellas. Jazz great Count Basie had a hey day with Beatles tunes such as “Hey Jude” and “Come Together,” and famed jazz pianist Herbie Hancock won a Grammy for his studio album The Imagine Project, in which he collaborated with artists such as P!NK and Seal in a cover of The Beatles’ “Imagine.” Vail Jazz House Band pianist Bill Cunliffe joins famed Aussie bassist Nicki Parrott and drummer Ernie Adams to show you just how jazzy The Beatles can be.

  •   Niki Haris’ Gospel Prayer Meetin’: 10 a.m. Sunday, Sept. 1

This performance is the first Vail Jazz Party event to sell out year after year, but this year, it’s moving to the wide open confines of the Gerald Ford Amphitheater. Starring soulful, soaring, charismatic vocalist Niki Haris, who performed for many years with Madonna, along with the Mile Hi Gospel Choir and nine A-list soloists, the big stage will be a party of dance-inducing, hand-clapping harmony. The audience is guaranteed to get swept up in the communal, gleeful surge of good vibes.

  •  Wycliffe Gordon’s Nu-Funk Machine Dance Party: 4:30 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 1

Clear out the chairs, people. You’re going to need space. Possibly the world’s most talented trombonist, Wycliffe Gordon would be the first to point out that the first three letters of funk spell F-U-N. The Vail Jazz Party House Band veteran is famous for getting crowds on their feet and believes that the foundation for any good time is for those both on and off the stage to “join us in the groove.” Joy will be shared all around.

2019 Vail Jazz Party Aug. 29 – Sept. 2

The 25th Annual Vail Jazz Party takes place Aug. 29 to Sept. 2. Tickets are available for individual sessions (starting at $25) HERE as well as party passes for five days of performances (starting at $375) HERE.

Vail Jazz to Launch Busy Summer for 25th

Ticketed performances are on sale now and free live music abounds all summer long

On a whim back in 1995, lifelong jazz fan and part-time Vail resident Howard Stone brought in a who’s who cast of the world’s greatest jazz artists for a long weekend live music extravaganza. Intended originally to be a one-off event, a mind-blown Stone walked away saying, “this is what I want to do for the rest of my life.”

Thus, the Vail Jazz Festival was born and has since blossomed into its current incarnation, a year-round exhibition of top musical talent from across the globe, hands on, in-depth educational programming and free performances.

In celebration of its 25th anniversary, Vail Jazz will launch into its biggest summer ever, with free and ticketed performances throughout the week from the end of June through Labor Day weekend. On Wednesday and Thursday evenings, respectively, the Vail Jazz Club and Vail Square series feature a lineup of the biggest names in jazz today. The Club Series emulates a true jazz club experience with intimate performances in the luxurious setting of Ludwig’s Terrace in the Vail Sonnenalp Hotel, while the Vail Square series allows artists to let loose on the big stage in the spacious, all-weather Jazz Tent in Lionshead. The grand finale of the festival is, of course, the original main event – the Vail Jazz Party over Labor Day weekend, bigger than it’s ever been for year 25.

“Over 25 years, Howard has curated a community of artists that span the globe. This summer, fan favorites return alongside the rising stars of tomorrow to present jazz in all its forms, from the American Songbook to Gypsy jazz, big band to blues, and salsa to straight ahead,” says Vail Jazz Executive Director James Kenly. “This lineup delivers the joy of jazz throughout the summer and across the valley.”

Tickets for all summer performances are on sale as of this week. Here’s the breakdown of what’s in store this summer, so be sure to mark your calendars.

Free events:

Vail Jazz @ The Market

Every Sunday from June 30 through Aug. 25 – Vail Jazz presents free live music from a rotating lineup of highly acclaimed regional musicians, 12-3 p.m. at The Jazz Tent at Solaris during the Vail Farmers Market & Art Show.

Vail Jazz @ The Remedy

Every Sunday night from July 7 through Aug. 25 at 8 p.m., a rotating cast of musical talent joins pianist Tony Gulizia and drummer Brian Loftus for free live music at The Remedy Bar in the Four Seasons Vail.

Jammin’ Jazz Kids

Every Sunday in July (July 7 through 28) from 11:00-11:45 a.m., the Jazz Tent at Solaris in Vail calls all kids from 4 to 12 years old. Vail Jazz’s Tony Gulizia and a team of musical educators lead a FREE hands-on workshop teaching the basics of rhythm and melody. Instruments provided.

Vail Jazz @ Riverwalk

Every Friday at 6 p.m. from July 5 – Aug. 23, Vail Jazz kicks off the weekend with a variety of acclaimed blues, funk, rock, bluegrass and jazz artists performing live at the outdoor amphitheater at The Riverwalk in Edwards. Bring a blanket, picnic and an urge to dance. Food and alcohol are available for purchase.

Veronica Swift and the Emmet Cohen Trio return to Vail Aug. 7 and 8.

Ticketed shows:

The Vail Jazz @ Vail Square fires up the all-weather Jazz Tent in Lionshead from 6 to 8 p.m. every Thursday from July 4 to Aug. 29. General admission seats are $25, preferred seats are $40 and premium seats are $50. Drinks are available for purchase. The Vail Jazz Club Series features the same artists who take the big stage at Vail Square, but performing two intimate dinner club sets at 5:30 and 8 p.m. every Wednesday from July 10 to Aug. 7 at Ludwig’s Terrace at The Vail Sonnenalp Hotel. Tickets are $40. Full dinner and drink service are available for purchase.

July 4 (Vail Square) Fiery pianist Marcia Ball returns to Vail to unleash upbeat musical storytelling

July 10 (Club) 11(VS) – Seven-string guitarist Yamanda Costa plays Brazilian samba, bossa nova

July 17 (Club) 18 (VS) – Iconic guitarist John Pizzarelli pays Tribute to Nat King Cole

July 24 (Club) 25 (VS) – Sultry vocalist Ann Hampton Callaway presents Jazz Goes to the Movies

July 31 (Club) Aug. 1 (VS) – Hailing from the Crescent City, keyboardist and soulful vocalist Jon Cleary pays Tribute to Henry Butler and the Great New Orleans Piano Tradition

Aug. 7 (Club) 8 (VS) – Hypnotic young vocalist Veronica Swift & The Emmet Cohen Trio return by popular demand

Aug. 15 (VS) – Acclaimed jazz and blues vocalist Catherine Russell makes Vail debut

Aug. 22 (VS) – Latin Jazz and salsa extraordinaire Pancho Sanchez ignites dance tunes

Go here for tickets and more information about the Vail Square series.

Go here for tickets and more information about the Club series.

Vail Jazz 25th Anniversary special anniversary gala celebration

July 8 – This one-of-a-kind event features internationally lauded trombonist Wycliffe Gordon displaying his funk stylings at Larkspur Restaurant. Expect a night of dancing, amazing food and an open bar. General admission tickets are $250, VIP Experience $300.

Get tickets here for the Wycliffe Gordon 25th Anniversary event.

The 25th Annual Vail Jazz Party

From Aug. 29 to Sept. 2, more than 40 of the world’s most talented jazz artists (including the iconic Vail Jazz House Band) converge at the Vail Marriott and in Vail Square for a Labor Day weekend stacked with explosive indoor and outdoor performances. In the same format as that first fateful event 25 years ago, artists rotate from stage to stage, some in unlikely combinations that result in a flurry of unique and previously untapped talent and improvisational masterpieces. To witness these shows are truly once-in-a-lifetime opportunities. New this summer, Niki Haris’ Gospel Prayer Meetin’ – historically the Vail Jazz Party’s most popular performance and always the first to sell out – will take place at the Gerald Ford Amphitheatre on Sunday, Sept. 1.

Get tickets here for the 25th Annual Vail Jazz Party.

For more information about Vail Jazz, call 970-479-6146.