Jammin’ Jazz Kids debuts July 7th – free interactive program for kids!

Is your child a future jazz star? Vail Jazz Festival launches Jammin’ Jazz Kids Sunday, July 7.

It’s true that certain children have a natural gift for music, but others just need to get their hands on an instrument to unveil their hidden talent. They get their chance this Sunday with the Vail Jazz Festival’s inaugural Jammin’ Jazz Kids.

Welcoming all children 6 to 12 years old, Jammin’ Jazz Kids features local piano sensation Tony Gulizia instructing a free hands-on jazz class using a variety of Orff instruments: tambourines, bongos, congas, maracas and xylophones specially set up with the blues scale. “It’s so important for children of this age to learn about the musical world and the importance of it,” says Gulizia, who has taught thousands of children’s musical classes throughout Vail Valley, including The Vail Jazz Foundation’s Jazz Goes to School program.

Children will discover the art of improvisation, the key focus of this first round of Jammin’ Jazz Kids. The series continues with a drum circle for children on July 28 and Latin percussion improvisation on Aug. 18. “It’s a lot more rewarding and has a much higher educational aspect when the kids are getting to learn hands-on,” Gulizia says. “You take the knowledge and the ability with you when you learn how to do it yourself.”

Jammin’ Jazz Kids takes place at the Jazz Tent in front of Solaris at the Vail Farmers Market on Sunday, July 7. The class is free and open to any child ages 6 to 12. Sign up from 10:45 to 11 a.m. The class is 45 minutes and precedes Jazz @ The Market, which features the Tony Gulizia Trio from 12 to 3 p.m.

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW:

WHEN: Sunday, July 7 11 a.m., Registration 10:45 a.m.

WHERE: Jazz Tent at Solaris at the Vail Farmers Market & Art Show, Vail Village

COST: Free

INFO: vailjazz.org

Jazz @ Vail Square starts on July 4th with Curtis Stigers & SaRon Crenshaw

SaRon Crenshaw has never seen someone openly cry while listening to him play the guitar, but there have been times when, after a performance someone has approached him, hold his hand in gratitude and walk away, leaving him holding a $100 bill.

“They would tell me how I’ve touched them,” says the New York City-based blues guitarist, who will be playing the first set in Lionshead on Thursday, July 4 for the 19th annual Vail Jazz Festival’s first Jazz@ Vail Square performance of the season.

Touched as audiences may be, the heartfelt donations his fans have made aren’t that surprising if you consider that Crenshaw’s a guy who’s been caught wandering through the crowd in the middle of a song playing his guitar with his tongue.

And he’s only part of the show on July 4. Internationally touted vocalist and saxophonist Curtis Stigers will fill the other half of the two-hour performance and both artists will pay tribute to “The Red, White and The Blues.”

Needless, to say, the latter color represents Crenshaw’s specialty. When asked about details of what the audience should expect from his performance, he simply says, “something they’ve never seen or heard.”

As far as “jazz” goes, neither Crenshaw nor Stigers are traditional representatives of the genre. Stigers, who melted the vast audience at Ford Amphitheater last year with his epic performance, has made a name for himself as not only a jazz vocalist but also as a saxophonist, guitarist and songwriter. The eclectic gamut of big names with whom he’s performed and recorded also speaks to his versatility: Prince, Eric Clapton, The Allman Brothers, Bonnie Raitt and Rod Stewart to name just a few.

You also may recognize his music from the theme song and soundtrack of the hit TV series “Sons of Anarchy,” and also from his 10th studio album – “Let’s Go Out Tonight” featuring songs by Bob Dylan, Steve Earle, David Poe and Richard Thompson.

“I’ve keep poking my foot through the side of the box,” Stigers says of his genrestraddling talent.

For Crenshaw, whose career has just begun to blossom, the “blues” moniker has been the one he’s heard the most, and to prove it, his guitar is adorned with a signature from the king of blues himself … B.B. King, that is.

“It was in Lynchburg, Virginia at B.B.’s show,” Crenshaw recalls of procuring the signature. “Yes I was nervous and I wanted to play something for him.” Then, a couple of years ago, Crenshaw actually shared a stage with King, opening the show, but his idol has yet to personally hear Crenshaw play. “B.B. didn’t hear me because he was still on the bus,” Crenshaw says. “But his staff and Tony Mason loved it and wanted my info.”

With his soulful vocals and thumping command of every song paired with his fiery guitar, Crenshaw’s sound has been compared to the likes of King as well as Albert Collins and Buddy Guy. Known to meander from heartfelt blues into strains classified by some as “jazz,” Crenshaw discerns the two genres by pointing out that “with the Blues, you can be telling someone a life story and don’t know it.”

When it comes to writing his own songs, the process is more cathartic than it is calculated. “There have been times I just might feel a groove when I’m playing and make it up,” he says. “Other times it would be something I went through.”

Of all the large stages and jazz festivals Crenshaw has played in recent years, his most memorable shows to date are those played at one of his regular venues – Terra Blues in New York’s Greenwich Village. “When I stop or end the song, people went clapping, whistling so loud that my ears went ringing,” he says.

Stigers, who has performed in Vail several times over the last 20 years, is excited to return with his band, long-time collaborators, Matthew Fries (piano), Keith Hall (drums), Cliff Schmitt (bass), and John “Scrapper” Sneider (trumpet). For the Independence Day show, Stigers will focus on the influence Blues Music has had on his recordings and his sound. “I always look forward to returning to Vail to play music and to visit the many friends I’ve made here over the years,” Stigers says. “I love this town!” The Jazz Tent at Vail Square heats up at 6 p.m. with SaRon Crenshaw, followed by Curtis Stigers after the 6:45 intermission.

Jazz Tickets on Sale, line up for Jazz @ Vail Square announced

The 2013 Thursday night lineup brings stars from every corner of the jazz genre and beyond! The Vail Jazz Festival has planted itself firmly on the map for jazz connoisseurs all over the world, but in recent years with its mix of Cuban, Latin, rock, blues, swing and soul, it has seriously pushed the limits of the genre and has thus attracted a slew of enthusiastic new fans.

Celebrating its 19th year, this summer is sure to recruit a whole lot more. The Festival brings local jazz heroes to the Vail Farmers Market and Kelly Liken restaurant every weekend, it partners with Bravo! Vail for intimate, one-of-a-kind jam sessions with orchestra artists at Jazz After events and culminates in an extravaganza of A-list musicians from around the globe at the Labor Day Weekend Jazz party. But the festival stops in Lionshead from 6 to 8 p.m. every Thursday with Jazz @ Vail Square in an open-air tent.

July 4: Curtis Stigers and SaRon Crenshaw pay tribute to The Red, White & The Blues. Kicking off the summer’s star-studded lineup with a star-spangled onslaught of talent with renowned saxophonist/vocalist Curtis Stigers and New York-based guitarist SaRon Crenshaw paying tribute to all that’s red hot and bluesy. Have you heard the theme song to Sons of Anarchy? That’s Stigers. He headlines the Pops with Bravo! Vail last year with 3,000 people listening in rapt wonder.

July 11: Wil Campa y Su Gran Union. Get your dancing shoes on for a veritable circus of steel-drum infused energy. Great indeed, the Cuban ensemble is comprised of 12 musicians who typically break out in collaborative stepping and instrument swinging. Making their Vail debut last year, they are back by popular demand.

July 18: Ann Hampton Callaway. Having performed on Broadway, sung with Wynton Marsalis and the Boston Pops and wowed the valley with her passionate, spontaneous delivery last winter when she landed at the Vilar Center paying tribute to Ella Fitzgerald Callaway returns to highlight the nation’s most revered stage and screen classics in her Great American Songbook-focused performance.

July 25: Frank Vignola & Vinny Raniolo. Although Frank Vignola may be a jazz guitarist, he has been influenced by rock icons such as Eddie Van Halen and Frank Zappa, and has played sidekick to the likes of Madonna and Ringo Starr. Five years ago, he teamed up with fellow New York guitarist Vinny Raniolo and the duo make their strings smoke as they match melodies on stage.

Aug. 1: John Pizzarelli Quartet. You could say that John Pizzarelli comes from a musical family. His father Bucky performed for two presidents (Ronald Reagan and Bill Clinton) and was in the band for The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson. John has played guitar with James Taylor and Paul McCartney. Along with his brother Martin on stand-up bass, John will be joined by his wife, fellow guitarist Jessica Molaskey, with whom he has a radio show in New York City. Pianist Larry Fuller and drummer Tony Tedesco round out the ensemble. Expect surprising, unique twists on jazz classics.

Aug. 8: Tommy Igoe Sextet. The spotlight turns onto the drum kit for this show, in which Tommy Igoe (son of legend Sonny Igoe) hammers out numbers that are guaranteed not to be your grandpa’s jazz. Having written the drumline for Broadway’s The Lion King, Igoe takes after everyone from his father to The Beatles. He started The Birdland Big Band, which is famous for regularly selling out Manhattan’s Birdland Jazz Club. He is joined by five more virtuoso musicians.

Aug. 15: Poncho Sanchez and his Latin Jazz Band. Also a percussionist, Poncho Sanchez specializes in the congo and can also belt out his fair share of salsa. He and his band have won Grammys for best Latin Jazz. Bringing an onslaught of horns, piano, percussion and a lot of Latin soul, Sanchez should ignite a dance party if not an actual flame or two.

Aug. 22 Lavay Smith and her Red Hot Skillet Lickers. Some people view jazz as a chilled out brand of music best suited for closed eye listening and calm finger snapping, but Lavay Smith takes that stereotype and launches it right out of its armchair. Oh, and did someone say dance party? With vocal stylings reminiscent of Billie Holiday and Bessie Smith, Lavay brings not just her Skillet Lickers to Vail but also some serious swing dancing.

Aug. 29: Clayton Brothers Sextet and The Vail Jazz All-Stars. Mainstays and resident heroes of the Vail Jazz Festival, saxophonist Jeff Clayton and bassist John Clayton compose the most dynamic delivery of original jazz this side of the Rocky Mountains with fellow famed jazz stars Terrell Stafford on trumpet, Bill Cunliffe on piano, Wycliffe Gordon on Trombone and Lewis Nash on drums. The energy leaps yet an extra octave with the Vail Jazz All Stars – a selection of the most talented young jazz musicians in North America whom the Sextet has mentored through the intensive Vail Jazz Workshop.

It all leads up to this, the climax. The Festival climax comes to a head Labor Day weekend with a whole separate line up of superstars at the Vail Jazz Party. For more information on the party, visit www.vailjazz.org.

Jazz Goes to School Sextet to Fill Vilar With Sounds of Jazz – Public is invited!

April 24, 2013 – Vail, Colorado – When Jazz Goes to School wraps up its fifteenth year in Eagle County with three special jazz performances at the Vilar Performing Arts Center in Beaver Creek on May 6 & 7 featuring the Jazz Goes to School Sextet, members of the public are invited to attend. “This is such a rich and exciting performance that we want to open it up to the whole community,” said Robin Litt, executive director of the Vail Jazz Foundation. Tickets are available to the public for the three performances at $15/adults and $5/children. Proceeds from ticket sales will go to the Vilar Center Community Performance Fund. Performances take place at 9:30 am and 1:00pm on Monday, May 6th and at 9:30 am on Tuesday, May 7th . Ticket can be purchased at www.vilarpac.org or by calling 970-845- TIXS (8497).

The fourth and final session of the Jazz Goes to School educational program, entitled “A Tribute to the Giants of Jazz”, features a selection of tunes that have shaped the history of jazz in America. Local jazz musician and professional jazz educator, Tony Gulizia (keyboard and vocals), directs the Jazz Goes to School program. “The concert includes legendary jazz tunes by Duke Ellington and Benny Goodman, Miles Davis, Dizzy Gillespie, and others”, said Gulizia. “We also perform a medley of blues compositions authored by the fifth graders as part of the concert – their lyrics are priceless!” said Gulizia.

Tony Gulizia’s brother Joey, also a professional jazz musician and educator (drummer), joins Tony on stage, as does Andy Hall (bass), Roger Neumann (saxophone), Mike Gurciullo (trumpet) and Michael Pujado (congas and percussion). The sextet presents a dynamic, foot stompin’ show that pulls together all the concepts taught in the first three classroom sessions, as demonstrated in some of Jazz’ finest works.

Jazz Goes to School is presented by the Vail Jazz Foundation (VJF), a 501 c3 charitable foundation dedicated to the perpetuation of jazz through performances and education, with a focus on young musicians and young audiences. The program educates over 1,100 fourth and fifth graders annually in the Eagle County School District RE-50J, plus the Eagle County Charter Academy, Vail Mountain School, The Vail Academy, Stone Creek Charter School, St. Clare of Assisi, and Vail Ski & Snowboard Academy. Jazz Goes to School has exposed over 15,000 school students to jazz music since inception.

New in 2013, elements of Jazz Goes to School will be offered to local and visiting youngsters in three free interactive sessions called “Jammin’ Jazz Kids” on July 7, July 28 and August 18th in conjunction with Jazz @ The Market on the Solaris green. “We can’t wait to bring parts of Jazz Goes to School’s successful and engaging programming to the community in a new environment,” said Litt, “Kids will have hands-on educational and entertaining opportunities to learn the fundamentals of jazz.” Youngsters, ages 6-12, will play a variety of percussion instruments – maracas, bongos, congas, tambourines, xylophones and Orff instruments in the programs, which will take place at 11am on each of the respective Sundays. Participating children will also listen to and join with jazz musicians in playing music and learning the art of improvisation.

Jazz Goes to School is sponsored in part by Alpine Bank, Vilar PAC Community Use Fund, Colorado Mountain Express (Official Transportation Provider), Eagle County RE-50J School District elementary school PTOs, PTOs of the private and charter schools, Ella Fitzgerald Charitable Foundation, United Way Eagle River Valley, Vail Resorts Echo, Vilar Performing Arts Center, AmericInn, Antlers at Vail, Local Joe’s Pizza, and numerous private donors.

Ticket to Jazz Goes to School Sextet on May 6 and 7 can be purchased at www.vilarpac.org or by calling 970-845-TIXS (8497).

Line up for 19th Annual Vail Jazz Festival Announced

March 20, 2013 – Vail, Colorado – The Vail Jazz Foundation announces the line-up of world class jazz performers for Thursday night Jazz @ Vail Square concert series and the Labor Day Weekend Jazz Party, both part of the 19th Annual Vail Jazz Festival.

“Last year’s line-up set the bar very high for Vail Jazz, but this summer’s schedule surpasses anything we have done in our 19 year history. While ‘Jazz’ is only a four letter word, it covers a lot of musical territory, including blues, Latin, swing, Brazilian, Gospel, straight ahead, bebop and beyond, and we will offer it all and much more over a spectacular 12 week summer Jazz Festival,” said Howard Stone, the chairman and artistic director of the Vail Jazz Foundation.

 

VAIL JAZZ AND BRAVO! VAIL

Vail Jazz will once again collaborate with Bravo! Vail by jointly presenting four performances, the first of which will be on June 28th at the Gerald R. Ford Amphitheater. “The Golden Age of Jazz” will be Bravo! Vail’s season opener and will feature jazz artists Byron Stripling, Jeff Clayton and Wycliffe Gordon along with the Dallas Symphony Orchestra conducted by Jeff Tyzik. In addition, Vail Jazz and Bravo! Vail will once again present the very popular “Jazz After” series of jam sessions on June 29, July 10 and July 24, with performances by members of the Dallas Symphony Orchestra, Philadelphia Orchestra and New York Philharmonic. Tickets for Jazz After will go on sale soon.

 

JAZZ @ THE MARKET AND JAMMIN’ JAZZ KIDS

In addition, the very popular Jazz @ The Market returns to the Vail Farmers’ Market each Sunday, June 23- August 25th, with free shows in the jazz tent on the green at Solaris. For the first time Vail Jazz will introduce Jammin’ Jazz Kids, which includes elements of the popular Jazz Goes to School program as complimentary programming with the Jazz @ The Market series. On three Sundays, July 7, 28 and August 18, prior to the performance in the jazz tent, children ages 6 to 12 are invited to join jazz musicians for an interactive, educational jazz experience that allows each participant a hands-on opportunity to learn the fundamentals of jazz. Participating youth will play a variety of percussion instruments – maracas, bongos, congas, tambourines, xylophones and Orff instruments. In addition, they will listen to and join with jazz musicians in playing music and learning the art of improvisation.

 

JAZZ @ VAIL SQUARE

The 9-show series of Jazz @ Vail Square returns beginning on July 4 th and running through August 29th . The series opens on July 4 th as Vail Jazz pays tribute to “The Red, White & The Blues” featuring a double billed line-up of Vail favorite Curtist Stigers and New York blues man, SaRon Crenshaw and continues with Cuban sensation Wil Campa y su Gran Union, jazz guitar duo Frank Vignola and Vinny Raniolo, John Pizzarelli Quartet, Tommy Igoe Sextet, Lavay Smith and her Red Hot Skillet Lickers and the Clayton Brothers Sextet and their students, the Vail Jazz All-Stars. The All-Stars, twelve of the best high school-aged jazz musicians, will have spent 10 days leading up to Labor Day Weekend under the tutelage of the Clayton Brothers Sextet. The Vail Jazz Workshop is widely known as the pre-eminent jazz education program in the country for young jazz musicians and serves as a launching pad for future jazz professionals.

Preferred seating will be available for $20 in advance; $25 day of show or for $99 for the nine-series Jazz Pass. “Preferred seating give guests the ability to get their choice of seats,” says Executive Director Robin Litt. “These tickets and the Jazz Pass allow you to arrive at your leisure and know that you will have a premium spot to enjoy the performance.” The remainder of the tent will remain free on a first-come, first-serve basis. Recommended donation of $5 is encouraged to support the 501(c)(3) Vail Jazz Foundation, which produces the Vail Jazz Festival and its unique educational programming that are at the core of its mission.

 

THE VAIL JAZZ PARTY

Labor Day Weekend marks the 19 th Annual Vail Jazz Party, a unique party format designed so every musician is featured every day of the holiday weekend, in many cases in a jam session format. Audience members have the opportunity to interact with performers in an intimate and special setting. This year’s Party features new and returning groups, accomplished soloists and a variety of special shows designed to both educate and entertain. 2013 will bring together a list of who’s who in jazz today. Favorites from 2012, Cyrille Aimée and Diego Figuerido, return after wowing Vail guests and residents in their debut appearance. Festival favorites, the Clayton Brothers Sextet (John Clayton, Jeff Clayton, Terell Stafford, Wycliffe Gordon, Lewis Nash and Bill Cunliffe) will perform throughout the weekend, together and in multiple configurations, serving as anchor and a major force at the Vail Jazz Party. Drummer Jeff Hamilton will be joined by his trio mates Tamir Hendelman on piano and Christoph Luty on bass. The Vail Jazz Alumni Quartet, all past members of the Vail Jazz Workshop and current touring musicians, will be composed of Sullivan Fortner, piano, David Wong, bass, Jimmy Macbride, drums and Tia Fuller, saxophone.

The Vail Jazz Party is known for its creative and entertaining educational programming through the presentation of muti-media presentations. Special shows in 2013 will include Shelly Berg’s MultiMedia History of Stride and Boogie Woogie Piano, Jeff Clayton’s Alto Show, Ken Peplowski & Diego Figueiredo’s Tribute to Charlie Byrd and the Bossa Nova Years, and Byron Stripling’s MultiMedia Salute to Miles Davis. The Vail Jazz All-Stars will also be featured in free performances on Saturday and Sunday afternoons.

The extremely popular Sunday morning Gospel show will once again be presented, but with some very special added features: joining Niki Haris’ Gospel Prayer Meetin’ will be the Mile Hi Gospel Ensemble; and the audience will be invited to sing along with Niki and the choir as songe lyrics will be provided to the audience.

Solosist include familiar faces to the Vail Jazz Party, including Ernie Adams ,drums, Karen Hammack, piano, Byron Stripling, trumpet and vocals. Newcomers to Vail will be Bruce Forman, guitar, Ken Peplowski, tenor sax, and Akiko Tsuruga, Hammond B-3 organ.

The Vail Jazz Party offers over 30 hours of jazz over a five day period, with jazz shows taking place at the Jazz Tent at Vail Square on Thursday night and during the days on Saturday, Sunday and Monday and at the event’s host hotel, the Vail Marriott Mountain Resort in the Ballroom on Friday, Saturday and Sunday nights. Late night sets that go into the early morning hours take place at “Wing’s Place” at the Marriott and create a real jam session atmosphere for artists to stretch out and have a “musical conversation” with their peers. Jazz music floods Vail with over eight separate shows featuring multiple sets in each show.

When Howard Stone was asked to explain why the Jazz Party is so special, the usually loquacious Stone said, “Unfortunately, words cannot adequately describe the magic that takes place over the Labor Day Weekend. Suffice it to say that when you get 30 of the best jazz musician together with a crowd of passionate jazz fans in a beautiful place like Vail, great jazz happens.”

The line-up of artists for Jazz @ The Market and the Sunday night series, Jazz @ Kelly Liken, will be announced in early May.

 

PASSES NOW ON SALE

Patron Passes for the Vail Jazz Party are now on sale at www.vailjazz.org and by calling 888-VAIL JAM or 970-479-6146. The $385 Patron Pass includes priority access to all eight performances, exclusive opening night party on Thursday and dinner with the artists on Saturday. Gift certificates are also available. Tickets to Jazz @ Vail Square, Jazz After jazz jams and individual session tickets for Vail Jazz Party will go on sale soon. Lodging and travel discounts are provided to Jazz Party attendees. Information is available at www.vailjazz.org .

2nd Annual Vail Jazz Winter Series presents Tony Monaco Quartet

March 5, 2013– Vail, CO – The Vail Jazz Foundation will continue the 2nd Annual Vail Jazz Winter Series with the Tony Monaco Quartet on Thursday, March 14th .

Tony is noted as one of today’s finest Hammond B-3 organ players on the jazz scene today. Named the top B-3 player for three consecutive years in Downbeat Magazines and Jazz Times Magazine, he will fill the Fitz Lounge at Manor Vail Lodge with a mix of high energy soul and funk jazz along with the blues. “Tony Monaco…crafts a collection of cuts that reveal the depth and versatility of the B-3…Here, Monaco…proves that he…is the sort of high-caliber player who can coax a response, showing off his…incredible range.” – Downbeat Magazine.

Tony started playing keyboard and the age of eight on the accordion. When he was twelve, he first heard legendary B-3 organ player Jimmy Smith and immediately, he knew that the Hammond B-3 was his calling. He played the accordion in nightclubs in Columbus, Ohio as a teenager. However, at the age of fifteen, Monaco contracted a rare disease, neuralgic amyotrophy, similar to polio. Nerves in his right arm, shoulder and triceps were affected first. Six months after his first bout with the disease, it returned to attack his left side. The only treatment available was with large doses of steroids that reduced the inflammation, but did not reduce the immense pain attributed with the disease. Because it was too painful to have the accordion straps over his shoulders, his father bought him his B3 organ. Less than a year after his run in with the disease, on his sixteenth birthday, Jimmy Smith called him and soon became his mentor / teacher, sharing jazz organ secrets with him and instruction over the phone.

A few years later, Jimmy invited Tony to perform at his California jazz club. For many years, Tony ran the family business, Monaco’s Palace Italian Restaurant, while performing in the lounge weekly. He then went into management with Sysco Foods and later with an ad agency. After finishing his Bachelor’s Degree in 1989, Tony returned to the family business, this time as a manager for Monaco Concrete. At the age of 35, Tony was hit with another round with the debilitating disease. This time, it affected his vocal cord and his ankles and forearms. He had throat surgery so he could talk, and to his ankles, so he could walk while assisted by a cane. Despite the limitations he was left with after the disease hit, he continues to perform. While his challenges could have sidelined him from his music career, Tony taught himself to play again, retraining weakened and destroyed muscles through repetition. As a result, Monaco has become the master of the B-3 organ player and masterful performer.

In 2000, he met B-3 organ player, Joey DeFrancesco, who offered to produce a debut CD for Monaco. The international success of the recording became the catalyst for a national tour. He continued to release CD’s and was awarded major endorsements from Suzuki and Hammond, the maker of the B-3. He is an accomplished teacher and has produced a series of instructional DVD’s that have become indispensable for serious organ students. In 2005, he began international tours that have taken him to Australia, New Caldondia, Canada as well as Jakarta Indonesia. He continues to be featured at all of the big jazz festivals in the US.

Monaco, who is affectionately referred to as Master Chops T, says, “I do some traditional organ, guitar, drums, sax-combo blues and shuffles,” Monaco says, “to an acid funk, to a ’60s-ish sidewinder à la funky Austin Powers, to a big band feel vocal of ‘Luck Be a Lady,’ to a smooth journey à la Pat Metheny, to an accordion blues using the organ in back, to a Woody Herman ‘Rhythm’ changes, to typewriter-organ style, bending notes—a secret—to a nostalgic ‘Me & Mrs. Jones’ sung with a horn arrangement similar to the original, to a Caribbean trip on ‘St. Thomas Calypso.”

Tony will be joined by Bob Rebholz on tenor saxophone, Bill Kopper on guitar and Vail’s own Allan Finney on drums. The Fitz Lounge at Manor Vail Lodge will be the “club” setting and the Quartet will perform two sets of music – 7:30 pm and 9:00 pm. Tickets are available for each seating at $20 in advance; $25 at the door. The Fitz will provide a menu for guests who want appetizers, a full dinner or dessert; and have a $10 food and beverage minimum for these performances. Tickets are available at www.vailjazz.org or 970-479-6146.

Now in its 19th year, The Vail Jazz Foundation produces innovative and prestigious educational programs including the pre-eminent Vail Jazz Workshop and Jazz Goes to School, along with the Vail Jazz Festival, one of the nation’s foremost jazz festivals featuring over 150 artists throughout the summer. Vail Jazz focuses on perpetuating jazz music through live performances that showcase the 3 artistry and talent of great jazz musicians, and through jazz education, with a focus on young musicians and young audiences. For more information, visit www.vailjazz.org.